Saving a Blue for June | Prostate Cancer Awareness

Published on: 18/06/2020

The real hue of the month ignites the spirit of awareness to all. To have or having diseases is not about survival, but about prevention and living a healthy, promising life.

Signifying awareness and protection, blue is the color for the month of June. This takes to the essence of prevention. As the color radiates its meaning, let this lead us to the awareness and color of the Prostate Cancer Month. Learning certain facts on how it occurs and it may be prevented will bring us insights for health benefits.


Prostate cancer has been deemed as the disease anchored among men. This is because men have the prostate gland where it might grow or appear. The prostate gland is part of the male reproductive system that helps in making semen. Scientifically, Prostate Cancer happens when there is an abnormal growth of body cells that starts to invade other cells that mainly develop on the gland cell. As released in the campaign of the Philippine Cancer Society (2014), prostate cancer cells can grow quickly. The damage in Deoxyribonucleic Acid known as DNA is mainly caused by prostate cancer among men. Every cell contains DNA. The study further shows that when the DNA in its normal state is damaged, the cell repairs it or it dies. However, in cancer cells, damaged DNAs gains immortality and continue to grow out of control.


On the updates of the Urology Care Foundation (2018), the early stages of prostate cancer, most often, has no symptoms. However, when symptoms occur, it is something to be the mindful of such as conditions like the following:

  • dull pain in the lower pelvic area
  • frequent urinating
  • difficulty in urinating
  • pain, burning or weak urine flow
  • blood in the urine (Hematuria)
  • painful ejaculation
  • pain in the lower back, hips or upper thighs
  • loss of appetite
  • loss of weight
  • bone pain

These symptoms need to be consulted to a healthcare provider.


Moreover, there are certain risk factors that could be a big help in determining how the disease like prostate cancer occurs.

  • The very first among the determining factors is age. The Philippine Cancer Society and American Cancer Society (2014) stated that Prostate Cancer is rarely detected to men at the age of 40, but the average age where it can be diagnosed is at 65. Hence, the disease is mostly happening among older men; 
  • Family history gains popularity as it is one of the high-risk factors determining prostate cancer cases. The American Urological Association (2018) published that a man may have 2 to 3 chances of having the disease if his father, brother, or son had it. This may conclude that a man having a history of the prostate cancer may have it or his generation;
  • And lifestyle has something to do with the high risks of having prostate cancer. Study shows that smoking and unhealthy diet leads the person to develop prostate cancer. Having the case of the disease may double the chances of those who are into smoking. More so, eating more calories, fatty foods, a lot of sweets, a lack of vegetables and exercise and obesity will surely increase the tendencies of the person of having cancer.


Men must be aware of what to take, what to do and how the body works for its condition is something that needs attention. A case like prostate cancer could still be prevented once healthy diet and lifestyle are observed. However, when a person is suffering from severe prostate conditions, it is high time to seek the attention of health professionals.


The real hue of the month ignites the spirit of awareness to all. To have or having diseases is not about survival, but about prevention and living a healthy, promising life.


Sources:

Prostate Cancer Awareness Campaign, Philippine Cancer Society and American Cancer Society, June 2014
Treatment Choices for Men With Early-Stage Prostate Cancer, National Cancer Institute, 2011
Urology Care Foundation, http://www.urologyhealth.org/urologic-conditions/prostate-cancer, 2018
American Cancer Society, About Prostate Cancer, cancer.org, 2019